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Author Topic: Marine Box 95-9 - Sept 8, 2011  (Read 1885 times)
XDeputy
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Posts: 248


« on: September 09, 2011, 05:55:25 PM »

Dispatched at approximately 6:45 am on Thursday, September 8.  A motorist was stuck in swift water raging across the top of the bridge on New Hope Road near Creek Road in Buckingham Township.  This creek is usually no greater than 10 feet wide, and a few feet deep.  At the time of the incident, the creek was 4-5' deep over the bridge, and about 150' wide.  Lingohocken units, along with Marine 3 (which was clearing another marine rescue in Warrington Township) were dispatched.  Chief and Deputy 35, along with Engine 35-1 (from the North side) and Engine 95 (from the South Side) arrived to find a man standing on the downstream side of his vehicle in waist-chest deep water that was continuing to rise, and holding onto his car.  Rescue 35 was sent to the bridge over the same creek one road down to provide backup in case the victim or rescuer(s) were carried downstream, and another firefighter was sent along the shore just downstream of the bridge with rope and water rescue equipment to address the same issue.  A spotter looked for upstream debris coming down.  Based on reports that the rescue boats were still 6-8 minutes away, and the vehicle was potentially beginning to move, it was decided to utilize a Buckingham Township Public Works large front end loader that was sent to the scene to effect the rescue.  Asst. 35 donned water rescue gear and entered the bucket of the loader.  The loader operator was highly experienced, and past Chief of the Midway VFC.  The loader was maneuvered out to the patient, and at one point only had 1-2 feet of tire above water.  The rescuer in the bucket was able to pull the victim into the bucket (the victim, who was an older gentleman, did not have the strength to do so) and remove him safely back to higher ground.  This rescue was completed in approximately 20 minutes from dispatch.  While a bit unorthodox and with the situation placing the rescuers at significant personal risk, rescuers adapted and overcame.  This tactic has been used previously, and was used with an even larger loader from one of the quarries at a lesser incident immediately following this.  Risk a little to save a little, risk a lot to save a lot.
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Emergency Mapping Solutions LLC (EMSLLC)
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« Reply #1 on: September 09, 2011, 06:57:19 PM »

Nice work, got the job done using unorthodox methods. Swiftwater makes you think outside the box.
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2darnold
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« Reply #2 on: September 09, 2011, 07:14:22 PM »

Nice Job !!!
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Seefour
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Posts: 47


« Reply #3 on: September 10, 2011, 09:25:25 AM »

Nice job.  Here's a thought...........  swift water rescue has become very prevalent in our region in the last decade.  I can't even count how many I've responded to.  Yet, I haven't responded to any hazardous materials incidents yet this year (and no, I don't consider a car leaking fuel as a haz-mat)...... but I get to have a mandatory haz-mat ops refresher stuck up my ass EVERY year.  I've also responded to countless building fires and auto extrications...  and yet, other than the initial training in these disciplines, there is no annual requirement.  Does anyone else out there think this is a little skewed?  I only have to recert EMT every three years.  I go to these haz-mat ops refreshers and gain very little. I'm not saying we shouldn't train on haz-mat, I just think it would make sense to cut back to an every three year recert and use the time that is freed up to train on things that we encounter on a much more frequent basis.  Is there anyone out there that is connected enough to the "policy makers" to begin the process of getting our priorities straight?
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BucksTruckinCo
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« Reply #4 on: September 10, 2011, 12:06:54 PM »

See4... I 100% agree with you. There is a downfall to this theory though. Just playing devils advocate here. Do you think that you may lose more vollies if this became mandatory? I know speaking for myself, it's very hard to juggle two jobs, kids, the home front, and meet my mandatory training for the fire service, ems service, and work training. I would love to take more classes on the weekends but the reality of it, there is just not enough time in the week for it all. But I do agree with you about this....
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CE(M)11
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Posts: 235


« Reply #5 on: September 10, 2011, 12:47:40 PM »

In a perfect world, or even not so perfect, we would be able to balance our training with our needs.  But we don't get a choice  here.  The dictates of HazMat training as well as HIPAA, Bloodborne pathogens, etc. come from the all-knowing agencies in D.C. such as OSHA and others.  These agencies cannot see and refuse to see into the real world outside of D.C., nor do they care.  They are examples of government run amok.  Our elected representatives must be told to reign these agencies in.  They (our representatives) must demand common sense regulation from the agencies.  We must demand that our representatives do so at the peril of their jobs.   
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2darnold
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Posts: 317


« Reply #6 on: September 10, 2011, 01:33:44 PM »

One of the problems here is that the paid people have all the influence in both the state and feds. They have good lobbyists. I asked my state rep why he voted on an issue and he said that is what asked for by the state people. I think our present state fire commissioner is very pro volunteer and helps us out. But by and large the volunteer system will end because of all the regulations that will be required. Are they good, yes. But by the time a person gets the time to complete all the training, they're too old to be active. When you are married with a couple of kids, you can't dedicate 4 nights and a weekend day for training, fundraising etc. When you are career, they just take one of your days and send you to school. Just my $.02 Stay safe and DRY
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Seefour
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« Reply #7 on: September 10, 2011, 07:14:22 PM »

BCT and Sd.......  I'm not advocating more training time.  I'm thinking more along the lines of using the current training time more efficently.  It's not a paid / volly thing either.  I'm both, and I still have a hard time keeping up with what's required.  However, when I do go to training, I would like to get more out of it than I do sitting in the bullshit haz-mat refresher.  What would happen if we collectively got together and said "we're not doing it this year because we have more important training concerns to focus on".  If all the career guys/girls/departments got on board they can't fire everyone.  If all the volunteer departments did the same what would they do put us in volunteer jail?
Let's push back at the policy makers that have never ridden the jumpseat!
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